Artist Statement

The work is about nothing and everything all at once.

The focus of my studio practice is grounded in representational painting. I am a painter who makes pictures, and through that, engages and explores our complex relationship to image. The work embodies my continued interest in the power of translating the ordinary people, places, and things from our everyday world through paint. The process of painting such mundane and banal moments can capture a genuine but elusive sense of our experience in the world and can communicate something that moves beyond language.


The paintings are informed through observation, photographic imagery, memory, and invention, but are most often built on a real moment. An individual painting may incorporate one or all of these, even though they appear as a somewhat coherent reality. While the representational components create the foundation of my paintings, providing my process structure, many of the elements develop through more intuitive and spontaneous means. I embrace my natural tendency to approach painting as an active dialogue with the material and the subject. Asserting, negating, and reasserting my observations invites the opportunity for chance that can pull back the veil on the world of appearances. This approach acts as a method of investigation and discovery to create moments of revelation and reflection, allowing environments to emerge from the surface.


I am interested in capturing subjects that are about nothing, a random visual experience, like looking out a window into your neighbor's backyard. That observation has no meaning or symbolism behind it—it just is. The process of capturing that in a painting creates the automatic effect of us constructing a narrative or searching for meaning. Whether it is what or how something is depicted in a painting, we (as the viewer) filter it through our own expectations. Paintings, like our dreams, can reveal things about ourselves by how we interpret them. On some level, I want the paintings to call our attention to these filters or expectations that mediate our experience, hopefully, pushing us to question what they may obscure or distort. I am particularly interested in what the viewer brings to their interaction with a painting.